Category Archives: databases

JoVE trial access

Please let us know if this resource would be valuable (or not!) for supporting your teaching, learning, and/or research!

ejournals@cambridge

The University of Cambridge now has trial access to JoVe, including all the different collections in JoVE Journal and JoVE Science Education.

Access the trial on campus via https://www.jove.com/

You can also create an account if you use an email address in the Cambridge domain – cam.ac.uk – which will provide access for the trial (“Create an account” on the green LOG IN tab top right on https://www.jove.com).

Trial access is open now and ends on 25 February 2019.

Please tell us if and how JoVE has been or would be useful to you in the future by completing this friendly form:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/e-resource-trials-feedback-form

The University currently subscribes to the JoVE collections in BiologyNeuroscience, and Immunology and Infection.  The trial provides access to all the published collections in JoVE.

JoVE is an innovative publication that consists in providing video demonstrations with protocols in the…

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New e-resource trials page and feedback form

Information on trial access to eresources should now be much clearer thanks to the eresources team!

ejournals@cambridge

For University of Cambridge members, a new web page listing forthcoming, active, and recently completed trials of e-resources has been created here:

https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/e-resource-trials

This is linked from the main Cambridge Libraries’ e-resources site (https://www.libraries.cam.ac.uk/eresources) and includes a new “Eresource Trials Feedback Form”.   This form will now be used for all trials (e-journals; e-books; e-resources) to invite feedback from users of trial access.

Librarians who mail out to their Departments and Faculties can include their own library’s contact details if they prefer to have trial feedback sent directly to their library.   A few general notes of guidance around trials are provided in Information for Cambridge Librarians on eresources (Raven access).

The aim of the new page is to provide clearer information to end-users about what trial access is available and when, and the new form is intended to make the process of providing feedback simpler and more…

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Enzymes Online is a database published by De Gruyter that covers topics relating to the function, analysis, and application of enzymes. The content is selected from journals and books published by De Gruyter in the areas of biology, medicine, chemistry, mathematics, physics, and engineering. Currently the database includes about 1,300 articles. De Gruyter describes the […]

via Trial access: Enzymes Online — ejournals@cambridge

 

JoVE: Journal of Visualized Experiments trial access

Trial access has been extended until 14th May!

Please send your feedback to library@ch.cam.ac.uk – we cannot recommend this resource for purchase without it!

This is a great opportunity for you to try out JoVE content for free, especially JoVE Chemistry!

ejournals@cambridge

The University of Cambridge now has trial access to the complete journal collections from JoVE: Journal of Visualized Experiments.

Access the trial on campus via https://www.jove.com/

You can also create an account if you use an email address in the Cambridge domain – cam.ac.uk – which will provide access for the trial (“Create an account” on the green LOG IN tab top right on https://www.jove.com).

Trial access ends on 7 May 2018.  Please send your feedback to library@ch.cam.ac.uk.

The University currently subscribes to the JoVE collections in Biology, Neuroscience, and Immunology and Infection.  The trial provides access to all the published collections in JoVE.

JoVE is an innovative publication that consists in providing video demonstrations with protocols in the physical and life sciences.  The ability for scientists to see video demonstrations – rather than textual descriptions only – of experiments significantly improves scientific reproducibility…

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Off campus access enabled for British Standards Online (BSOL)

Great that this resource is now available off-campus too!

ejournals@cambridge

Access to British Standards Online is now enabled for off campus users via this link.

Both the on and off campus links are available from the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Zhere.

Records for standards in BSOL will soon be discoverable in iDiscover.   Access via iDiscover will only be available for on campus users (as we cannot at the moment build the off campus link into the iDiscover records).

The University of Cambridge started providing access to British Standards Online from December 2017.  Unfortunately it was not possible to provide both on and off campus access at the time of going live.  BSOL could not be provided for off campus users via our EZproxy server and BSOL has not yet implemented Shibboleth.  The British Standards Institute expect to implement Shibboleth by the end of the third quarter of 2018.  Until they do, we can provide off campus via…

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British Standards Online (BSOL)

We hope you find this resource useful!

ejournals@cambridge

The University of Cambridge now has on campus access only to the British Standards Online (BSOL) resource at the following URL

http://bsol.bsigroup.com/

Shibboleth access is to be implemented by the British Standards Institute for off campus authentication in the second or third quarter of 2018.  We are working on providing access via EZproxy in the interim.

Access is available via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z here

http://libguides.cam.ac.uk/az.php?a=b

And records for the standards in BSOL will soon be available in iDiscover and updated weekly.  NB only on campus users will be able to link through to the standards from iDiscover records.

BSOL is an online library of over 90,000 internationally recognized standards with application to a wide range of subjects, from environmental management to IT security, from construction to food safety.

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How to resolve connection failure & timed out error messages

Really useful advice if you ever cannot access an eresource. Give it a go and let us know how you get on.

ejournals@cambridge

Connecting via EZproxy links

Some users have reported seeing error messages when connecting to resources via EZproxy links, both on and off campus.  Usually these links are in iDiscover or in the ejournals A-Z.  Over the next several weeks we are aiming to upgrade our EZproxy server, which we expect to have a beneficial effect regardless, and will be the first step towards resolving the issue.

Typical messages users have reported are: “Connection to libsta28.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048 was interrupted while the page was loading”, “This site can’t provide a secure connection” or a time out message. As we do not have a solution now, we offer the following work-arounds.  If none of these work for you, please report the issue using the form here.  Thank you for your patience.

These steps should be followed in order to regain access:

  • Clear all the cookies, browsing history and cache of your browser and restart…

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ChemRxiv Beta open for submissions

ChemRxiv is a free online submission, distribution, and archival service for unpublished preprints in chemistry and related areas.

ChemRxiv is now available in a fully functioning Beta version for use and feedback by researchers. Find out more from this ACS press release: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2017/august/chemrxiv-beta-open-for-submissions-and-powered-by-figshare.html?hootPostID=c5c5e00bed4e6b0db448b1ba9bc18551.

ChemRxiv itself can be found here.

 

Advance notice of British Standards Online trial access

Great news, I look forward to hearing more about the trial.

ejournals@cambridge

A further trial of British Standards Online (BSOL)will be held from 1 September 2017 to 31 October 2017.

URL for access and reminders and contacts will be posted here nearer to September.

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Text & Data Mining LibGuide

Please have a look at this brilliant new guide on TDM!

ejournals@cambridge

We are keen to help the research process where we may be able to make a contribution towards facilitating text & data mining in the University.  To that end we offer a new LibGuide on text & data mining in the growing number of guides in the Cambridge Libraries’ family of LibGuides.

The aim of this guide is to make a start towards exposing the breadth of content (mostly library-subscribed) that may be of potential exploitation by Cambridge researchers wanting to use the techniques of text and data mining in their research.  The guide summarizes the main points in the Hargreaves exception and builds on and links out to professional bodies and information sources to provide librarians and University members with a beginner’s guide to first steps in TDM and considerations it is important to make.

The guide provides a means of contacting us to clear any issues that…

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New books recently purchased

The following books were recommended by members of the Department of Chemistry and are now available to borrow.

If you are a member of the Department of Chemistry and would like to recommend anything, whether it is an online journal, a book, an ebook, or a database, please see our guidance here. Recommendations are always welcome.

The Physical and Chemical Basis of Molecular Biology: Fundamentals

CREIGHTON: The physical and chemical basis of molecular biology. Helvetian Press, 2011

NICOLAOU: Classics in total synthesis: targets, strategies, methods. Wiley-VCH, 1996

NICOLAOU: Classics in total synthesis II: more targets, strategies, methods. Wiley-VCH, 2003

NICOLAOU: Classics in total synthesis III: further targets, strategies, methods. Wiley-VCH, 2011

Book cover: Ball Milling Towards Green Synthesis

RANU: Ball milling towards green synthesis. RSC, 2015

The Biophysical Chemistry of Proteins

CREIGHTON: Biophysical chemistry of nucleic acids and proteins. Helvetian Press, 2010

SpringerMaterials trial extended to 30 May 2017

Please do try out the database with your real life examples and let Clair have your feedback. She cannot put forward a recommendation to purchase this database without it.

Make the most of access while you have it!

ejournals@cambridge

Further to the notice promoting the trial access to the SpringerMaterials database we are pleased to inform that the trial has been extended to 30 May 2017 to allow for a full review of this resource for the materials science, chemistry and engineering user communities.

To access the trial please go to:

http://materials.springer.com/

or off campus login via Shibboleth or via ezproxy here:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://materials.springer.com/
Please send your valuable feedback on this resource to Clair Castle, Librarian at the Department of Chemistry, at cmc32@cam.ac.uk.

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SpringerMaterials trial access begins today

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Trial access to SpringerMaterials starts today and ends on 2nd May.

Please go to http://materials.springer.com/ (access within the University of Cambridge only) to get access to the complete database, which has been specifically designed to save you a LOT of time when searching for materials properties.

Please send your valuable feedback on this resource to Clair Castle, Librarian at the Department of Chemistry, at cmc32@cam.ac.uk.

About the database:

SpringerMaterials is a comprehensive database for identifying materials properties and covers data from materials science, physics, physical and inorganic chemistry, engineering and other related fields.

Vast collection of quality content:

  • Covering multiple material types, property classes and applications.

Interactive functionality saving time:

  • Interactive crystal structures, data tables, phase diagrams, and fast data export are tools help save critical time and provide deep insights into material structures and properties.

Materials science related search options:

  • Multiple search tools to quickly find material property data.

Trusted and curated resource:

  • Thousands of materials science experts around the globe work to ensure the high quality of the platform.

How SpringerMaterials helps researchers:

  • Access the most comprehensive and multidisciplinary collection of materials and chemical properties with extensive coverage of all major topics in materials science and related disciplines.
  • Take advantage of the best and most trusted materials science sources such as Landolt Börnstein data on a single platform. Comprising journals, books and standalone data sets.
  • Save time with accurate and efficient search results using multiple specialized search and result refinement functions.
  • Take advantage of interactive functionalities to analyze, manipulate and visual different data types quickly.
  • Integrate materials data types easily in your research workflow with data export in standard formats.

SpringerMaterials infographic

SpringerMaterials webinar and trial access coming soon!

SpringerMaterials is a comprehensive database for identifying materials properties and covers data from materials science, physics, physical and inorganic chemistry, engineering and other related fields.

SpringerMaterials research benefits:

  • A single platform covering curated data from all major topics in materials science, chemistry, physics and engineering
  • Take advantage of specialized integrated features to analyze, manipulate, and visualize different data types
  • Save time with multiple search methods and advanced result refining options
  • Export data in multiple formats for further use in other software/applications

The University has arranged trial access to SpringerMaterials from 5th April until 2nd May, during which time you will be able to access the complete database. Details of how to access the database will be circulated on 5th April.

A webinar* demonstrating the database will take place on 5th April between 14:30 and 15:15. You can attend this remotely or view it in the Todd-Hamied Room, Department of Chemistry. If you are not able to attend on the day, the webinar will be available throughout the trial period, but we would strongly recommend that you attend on the day as it will highlight the most relevant and useful features and you will have the opportunity to ask questions.

Please register your attendance at the webinar here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3688859693808838915

Please let us know that you want to attend the webinar in person here: https://doodle.com/poll/mux298zu2c4w3tc3

SpringerMaterials infographic

National Chemical Database Service: help to justify its continued support

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Do you know about or already use the National Chemical Database Service (NCDS)?

It is an EPSRC-funded service provided by the Royal Society of Chemistry to all students and other members of UK academic institutions. It brings together tools and resources for UK researchers in chemistry and related fields.

All web-based services are freely accessible from any UK academic network. These include:

  • ACD/I-Lab – an online tool which features predictions and databases of physicochemical properties and NMR spectral information.an online tool which features predictions and databases of physicochemical properties and NMR spectral information.
  • Available Chemicals Directory (ACD) – a database of commercially available chemicals that can be searched by structure.
  • Chemicalize – a public web resource which identifies chemical structures in webpages and other text using ChemAxon’s Name to Structure parsing.
  • ChemSpider – a free chemical structure database providing access to over 28 million structures, properties and associated information from more than 400 data sources.
  • Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) – a collection of over 600,000 small-molecule organic and organometallic crystal structures that can be visualised and downloaded.
  • CrystalWorks – provides access to the wide range of crystallographic structural data made available by the Chemical Database Service.
  • DETHERM -one of the world’s largest thermophysical databases and contains data for 4,200,000 data sets, 129,500 mixtures, and 38,850 pure compounds.
  • Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) – the world’s largest database for fully identified inorganic crystal structures.
  • SPRESIweb – allows users to search 5.52 million molecules and 4.26 million reactions, extracted from 675,000 references and 164,000 patents covering the years 1974 – 2011.

Find more information about these resources here.

Help to demonstrate the scientific impact of the NCDS

The NCDS needs your help:

The National Chemical Database Service is supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council on the basis that it meets a community need: access to specialist databases that enable research in chemistry and related fields. As part of EPSRC’s routine review of mid-range facility provision, we are preparing an application (called a Statement of Need) to justify continued support of the NCDS after 2017. While we will collate the application on behalf of our Advisory Board, it represents the views and needs of the UK scientific community, so your input is vital to its success. You can help us ensure that all of UK academia retains access to the NCDS resources in the following ways:

Please see the post on the Chemical Database Service Blog here.

e-EROS Encyclopedia of Reagents for Organic Synthesis

We hope this database will be of use to chemists.

ejournals@cambridge

The University of Cambridge now has access to the important reference work for reagents and catalysts for the study or organic synthesis, e-EROS Encyclopedia of Reagents for Organic Synthesis.

The Encyclopedia can be accessed via this link or via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z.

e-EROS gives detailed information on more than 4,500 reagents and catalysts, and every year more than 200 new or updated articles are added in order to keep the Database up-to-date.

A representation of quite a small molecule: an isomer of the alkane C16H34. Possibly the simplest molecule that can never be made.

Access has been enabled by collaboration between the University Library, the Betty and Gordon Moore Library and the Department of Chemistry Library.

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Thing 19 – Text and Data Mining — 23 Research Things Cambridge

Text and data mining (TDM) is a process through which large amounts of information can be analysed electronically. This allows researchers to work through far more research content than they would ever be able to do manually. Interested and want to learn more? Well check out our brief intro video below and then get cracking […]

via Thing 19 – Text and Data Mining — 23 Research Things Cambridge

American Chemical Society announces intention to establish “ChemRxiv” preprint server to promote early research sharing

What do chemists think about this? Let me know!

ejournals@cambridge

WASHINGTON, Aug. 10, 2016 — The American Chemical Society (ACS) today announced its intention to form ChemRxiv, a chemistry preprint server for the global chemistry community, proposed as a collaborative undertaking that will facilitate the open dissemination of important scientific findings. The Society is presently in the process of inviting interested stakeholders to participate in helping to shape the service ahead of its anticipated launch.

ChemRxiv is expected to follow the established models of arXiv in physics and bioRxiv in the life sciences by enabling researchers working across diverse areas of inquiry to share early results and data with their scientist-colleagues ahead of formal peer review and publication,” says Kevin Davies, Ph.D., who, as Vice President within the ACS Publications Division, will be spearheading the effort as part of a joint undertaking with the Society’s Chemical Abstracts Service. “Preprints are fully citable and are freely accessible preliminary communications…

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Cambridge University Press downtime : 26 June 2016

ejournals@cambridge

The following platforms will all be unavailable on Sunday 26th June 2016 for 4 hours between 09:00 AM BST and 13:00 BST.

Cambridge Journals Online (CJO)

Cambridge Books Online (CBO)

Cambridge Histories Online (CHO)

Cambridge Companions Online (CCO)

Shakespeare Survey Online (SSO)

University Publishing Online (UPO)

This essential maintenance is to test the performance of systems ahead of the launch of a new academic platform later this year

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Engineering Village

This resource may be really useful for chemists, especially the patent information.

ejournals@cambridge

Trial access is now enabled to Engineering Village for

Compendex; Inspec; US Patents; EP Patents; EnCompassLIT; and EnCompassPAT

Trial access is available via this link.

Trial end date:  03/06/2016

Please send your feedback on the trial to : cued-library@eng.cam.ac.uk

Links to full text articles exist where the “Full Text” icon is displayed against a citation.  These links use DOI numbers listed in the records to link out to full text on publisher websites.  We are working with Elsevier now to enable linking via our OpenURL resolver to display links to our subscribed content during the trial access.  This should be available soon.

Further information on the databases being trialled in Engineering Village is given below.

Engineering Village, the essential engineering research database, provides a searchable index of the most comprehensive engineering literature and patent information available. Designed by, and for, the engineering community, this comprehensive, all-inclusive platform gives…

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