Category Archives: general

Call for Data Champions at the University of Cambridge

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Are you passionate about good research data management?

Do you support FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reuseable) research principles?

Are you looking to boost your career with some peer and researcher engagement?

The Research Data Facility at the Office of Scholarly Communication are looking for people who would like to volunteer to become Data Champions within their departments, institutes and colleges to provide local expertise about research data management (RDM) issues.

Who can become a Data Champion?

Anyone interested in research data management and sharing who would like to become the local expert on research data management (RDM). We welcome researchers, students, librarians, IT managers, data managers, other members of staff and anyone with a keen interest in RDM.

What will be required of me?

  • Data Champions promote good RDM and support for FAIR research principles in a variety of ways. For example:
  • Delivering workshops on data handling and other related training at their departments/institutions
  • One to one mentoring
  • Promoting/participating in development of data management tools
  • Participating in open research studies
  • Other relevant activities

Individual Champions have opportunities for personal and professional development by interacting with their community at the University and by participating in external trainings and meetings. Champions are also encouraged to participate in and liaison with similar local and international initiatives or activities across the globe.

As a community, Data Champions communicate with each other (personally, via internet and during bimonthly Data Champion Forums) to share their experience and discuss about progress, achievements, problems and any other issues.

Find out more about the benefits of becoming a Data Champion via the Research Data Facility website and apply via this form by Tues 27th February: https://cambridge.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_29sKJj6I7EPW4D3

Find out more about Data Champions in the Department of Chemistry and what open data related activities we have carried out!

Convert your files containing experimental data into an open data format

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As part of the Data Champions initiative, we invite members of the Department of Chemistry to contribute to a list of instructions for converting the data you generate through experiments using techniques such as NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, x-ray crystallography etc. into open data formats that can be shared easily.

The aim is to save researchers time and effort in trying to find this out themselves, and to make it as easy as possible for them to share their data in an open format that is accessible to everyone.

First on our list are very brief instructions for converting NMR spectroscopy data from TopSpin to a text file in the internationally accepted open data format JCAMP-DX.

Please send your instructions to library@ch.cam.ac.uk and they will be added to the list.

Data Champions at the Department of Chemistry

Data Champions are local experts on research data management and sharing who can provide advice and training within their departments.

Your Data Champions currently are:

We are currently planning research data management related activities that we can carry out in the department. Please let us have your ideas! Contact one of the Data Champions or Clair Castle, Librarian at the Department of Chemistry at library@ch.cam.ac.uk.

Please visit the Chemistry Library’s Open Data website to find out more about your Data Champions, and other resources that will help chemists do open research.

Re-imagining library spaces at the University of Cambridge

Take a look at ‘The Tracker Project’ report by Furturelib! Students using the Chemistry Library wore eyetracking devices while finding books and other items – with fascinating results. We will digest the project findings and hopefully act upon them in future.

Let us know what you think!

Source: Re-imagining library spaces at the University of Cambridge