Category Archives: researchers

ChemRxiv Beta open for submissions

ChemRxiv is a free online submission, distribution, and archival service for unpublished preprints in chemistry and related areas.

ChemRxiv is now available in a fully functioning Beta version for use and feedback by researchers. Find out more from this ACS press release: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2017/august/chemrxiv-beta-open-for-submissions-and-powered-by-figshare.html?hootPostID=c5c5e00bed4e6b0db448b1ba9bc18551.

ChemRxiv itself can be found here.

 

Convert your files containing experimental data into an open data format

OAlogo

As part of the Data Champions initiative, we invite members of the Department of Chemistry to contribute to a list of instructions for converting the data you generate through experiments using techniques such as NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, x-ray crystallography etc. into open data formats that can be shared easily.

The aim is to save researchers time and effort in trying to find this out themselves, and to make it as easy as possible for them to share their data in an open format that is accessible to everyone.

First on our list are very brief instructions for converting NMR spectroscopy data from TopSpin to a text file in the internationally accepted open data format JCAMP-DX.

Please send your instructions to library@ch.cam.ac.uk and they will be added to the list.

Data Champions at the Department of Chemistry

Data Champions are local experts on research data management and sharing who can provide advice and training within their departments.

Your Data Champions currently are:

We are currently planning research data management related activities that we can carry out in the department. Please let us have your ideas! Contact one of the Data Champions or Clair Castle, Librarian at the Department of Chemistry at library@ch.cam.ac.uk.

Please visit the Chemistry Library’s Open Data website to find out more about your Data Champions, and other resources that will help chemists do open research.

Bonus Thing 24 – Behind the Scenes

It’s like the ‘how we did this bit’ section at the end of each Planet Earth II episode!

23 Research Things Cambridge

By the time you read this, the first live run of the 23 Research Things programme will have just concluded with (hopefully) lots of success and accolades.

But what actually goes into making a programme like 23 Research Things? Why did we use YouTube videos and what did Moore Methods have to do with it all? Well in our typical style, we made a video about it so check it out.

Bonus Thing 24 activities

Watch some videos from any of the following channels: The Brain Scoop [can contain dissections so watch with caution], PBS Ideas Channel, SciShow.

What did you like about the suggested videos that you watched? What didn’t you like? Is there anything that they did or featured that you could incorporate into your research or work?

What did you think about our Moore Methods videos?

To help us do better at this sort of thing, don’t…

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Thing 23 – Ultimate Research Tool

Well done Georgina!

23 Research Things Cambridge

We’ve covered a lot of tools and concepts over the past few weeks. 22 tools and concepts to be precise and if you’re still with us at this point then well done! We are almost at our last and final Thing…the unveiling of the Ultimate Research Tool.

One tool to rule them all…you get the idea. So check out the Ultimate Research Tool video to find out what on earth it is. Go on! Now!

Video transcript

Now you’ve watched the video, gosh. What a reveal!

Thing 23 activities

Reflect on and blog about the Ultimate Research Tool. Do you agree with our choice and what role does the tool play in your life? Will you use it differently in the future now you’ve taken this programme and watched the video above?

Also, take some time to reflect and blog about the overall 23 Research Things programme. What were the…

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Thing 22 – Tracking success

23 Research Things Cambridge

We’ve covered a lot of different tools for sharing and promoting your research. From Twitter to blogging, and sharing slides to sharing data through Creative Commons, there’s lots of ways to shout about what you do and how you do it.

But how do you track whether any of these efforts are even being noticed? Well, that’s what Thing 22 is all about…alternative metrics!

Check out our video all about exciting analytics and metrics that are easy to use and brilliant at helping you find out what is going on in the online world that’s out there.

Video transcript

Thing 22 activities

Explore the analytics section of your Twitter account. What sort of things did you find out?

Track a URL using TweetReach. Try experimenting using a URL from an existing tweet

Add the Altmetric bookmarklet to your browser and test it out on some academic articles (either your own or from someone…

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Thing 21 – Managing citations

23 Research Things Cambridge

Welcome to Week 8! We’re almost at the end of the programme and this week’s theme is Pulling It All Together.

For Thing 21, we will be looking at managing both your own citations for your research as well as other people’s citations of your own work. First up, we’re looking at managing all those citations of useful resources with one handy tool: Zotero.

Check out our video on Zotero to find out why using a bibliographic management tool can save you time, stress, and a whole lot of effort.

Video transcript

But what about managing citations of your own work and making sure you get credited appropriately? Well registering for an ORCID is an excellent first step. ORCID (or Open Researcher and Contributor ID) is an alphanumeric code that is unique to you so you don’t have to worry about someone with a similar name to you…

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Thing 19 – Text and Data Mining — 23 Research Things Cambridge

Text and data mining (TDM) is a process through which large amounts of information can be analysed electronically. This allows researchers to work through far more research content than they would ever be able to do manually. Interested and want to learn more? Well check out our brief intro video below and then get cracking […]

via Thing 19 – Text and Data Mining — 23 Research Things Cambridge