Category Archives: Tools to help you do your research

Try a Raspberry Pi in the Chemistry Library!

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The Chemistry Library has made two Raspberry Pis available for researchers from the Department of Chemistry to use (in the Library only) on a ‘try before you buy’ basis. They are intended to provide inspiration and ideas for researchers on how they can use Raspberry Pis in their research projects.

Raspberry Pis are low-cost, high-performance computers that people use to learn and solve problems and have fun, as well as doing some serious research, with!

We welcome you to experiment with the Raspberry Pis and to share your knowledge and expertise on a wiki that we have created here: https://wikis.ch.cam.ac.uk/library-pi/wiki/index.php/Main_Page.

The wiki provides instructions on how to set up and use the Pis in the library, examples of research projects that have used them, and information on the modules we have available (Gertbot Robotics Board, Sense HAT, and Camera modules so far). We welcome new project ideas and recommendations for additional modules.

You can edit the wiki by logging in with your Admitto password (currently researchers at the Department of Chemistry only, we might be able to consider allowing Chemistry undergraduate students to use them later on).

Alongside the Pis themselves we have a small selection of books and guides to help provide ideas for research projects and get you started. Please let us know of any other resources you think it would be useful to provide.

There is specific guidance on how to reserve and use the Pis in the library on the wiki and on posters next to them. Please follow this guidance.

Please experiment and contribute to the wiki!

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Text & Data Mining LibGuide

Please have a look at this brilliant new guide on TDM!

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We are keen to help the research process where we may be able to make a contribution towards facilitating text & data mining in the University.  To that end we offer a new LibGuide on text & data mining in the growing number of guides in the Cambridge Libraries’ family of LibGuides.

The aim of this guide is to make a start towards exposing the breadth of content (mostly library-subscribed) that may be of potential exploitation by Cambridge researchers wanting to use the techniques of text and data mining in their research.  The guide summarizes the main points in the Hargreaves exception and builds on and links out to professional bodies and information sources to provide librarians and University members with a beginner’s guide to first steps in TDM and considerations it is important to make.

The guide provides a means of contacting us to clear any issues that…

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Convert your files containing experimental data into an open data format

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As part of the Data Champions initiative, we invite members of the Department of Chemistry to contribute to a list of instructions for converting the data you generate through experiments using techniques such as NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, x-ray crystallography etc. into open data formats that can be shared easily.

The aim is to save researchers time and effort in trying to find this out themselves, and to make it as easy as possible for them to share their data in an open format that is accessible to everyone.

First on our list are very brief instructions for converting NMR spectroscopy data from TopSpin to a text file in the internationally accepted open data format JCAMP-DX.

Please send your instructions to library@ch.cam.ac.uk and they will be added to the list.

Data Champions at the Department of Chemistry

Data Champions are local experts on research data management and sharing who can provide advice and training within their departments.

Your Data Champions currently are:

We are currently planning research data management related activities that we can carry out in the department. Please let us have your ideas! Contact one of the Data Champions or Clair Castle, Librarian at the Department of Chemistry at library@ch.cam.ac.uk.

Please visit the Chemistry Library’s Open Data website to find out more about your Data Champions, and other resources that will help chemists do open research.

Want to work in your room but need an app which is only on University computers?

laptop-1019782_1280 (2)Use DS-Remote!

DS-Remote is a service exclusively for the use of University of Cambridge students to aid in access to Windows applications outside of the MCS for use on a device, having installed a remote desktop client.

 

Access your favourite cloud storage on MCS Windows

Did you know that on MCS Windows its possible to access your favourite cloud storage?

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Click on the Start button on the MCS (ex-PWF) machines in the Chemistry Library, or in Rooms G30 and 154:

Start -> Microsoft -> OneDrive
Start -> Dropbox -> Dropbox
Start -> Google -> Google Drive

Make your data and papers open via Symplectic

Open Access and Open Data are changing: Share everything via Symplectic

Demo of new system in the Pfizer Lecture Theatre for members of the Department of Chemistry on 28th February at 13:15

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The current Open Access and Open Data services are being integrated with Symplectic Elements, which will bring many benefits to researchers, administrators and the Open Access and Open Data staff. The new system is live and we are asking researchers at the Department of Chemistry to start using it now. The benefits of the new system include:

  • you can deposit your data and articles in one place
  • you will instantly receive a placeholder DOI for data
  • your outputs get into the repository quicker, which increases their visibility
  • you enter the information about your publication once but it is used in many systems saving you time in the future
  • better reporting capabilities for the Open Access/Data, which means more accurate reports for Departments, Faculties and Schools
  • all research outputs can be uploaded to the repository via the new system

Come and see the new system being demonstrated and find out more about using it for all your research outputs. The demo will take approximately 30 minutes and there will be time for questions and answers.

Find out more here: http://osc.cam.ac.uk/open-research/symplectic-elements-deposit-pilot

We look forward to seeing you there!

Thing 23 – Ultimate Research Tool

Well done Georgina!

23 Research Things Cambridge

We’ve covered a lot of tools and concepts over the past few weeks. 22 tools and concepts to be precise and if you’re still with us at this point then well done! We are almost at our last and final Thing…the unveiling of the Ultimate Research Tool.

One tool to rule them all…you get the idea. So check out the Ultimate Research Tool video to find out what on earth it is. Go on! Now!

Video transcript

Now you’ve watched the video, gosh. What a reveal!

Thing 23 activities

Reflect on and blog about the Ultimate Research Tool. Do you agree with our choice and what role does the tool play in your life? Will you use it differently in the future now you’ve taken this programme and watched the video above?

Also, take some time to reflect and blog about the overall 23 Research Things programme. What were the…

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