Category Archives: Open Access

Convert your files containing experimental data into an open data format

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As part of the Data Champions initiative, we invite members of the Department of Chemistry to contribute to a list of instructions for converting the data you generate through experiments using techniques such as NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, x-ray crystallography etc. into open data formats that can be shared easily.

The aim is to save researchers time and effort in trying to find this out themselves, and to make it as easy as possible for them to share their data in an open format that is accessible to everyone.

First on our list are very brief instructions for converting NMR spectroscopy data from TopSpin to a text file in the internationally accepted open data format JCAMP-DX.

Please send your instructions to library@ch.cam.ac.uk and they will be added to the list.

Data Champions at the Department of Chemistry

Data Champions are local experts on research data management and sharing who can provide advice and training within their departments.

Your Data Champions currently are:

We are currently planning research data management related activities that we can carry out in the department. Please let us have your ideas! Contact one of the Data Champions or Clair Castle, Librarian at the Department of Chemistry at library@ch.cam.ac.uk.

Please visit the Chemistry Library’s Open Data website to find out more about your Data Champions, and other resources that will help chemists do open research.

Make your data and papers open via Symplectic

Open Access and Open Data are changing: Share everything via Symplectic

Demo of new system in the Pfizer Lecture Theatre for members of the Department of Chemistry on 28th February at 13:15

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The current Open Access and Open Data services are being integrated with Symplectic Elements, which will bring many benefits to researchers, administrators and the Open Access and Open Data staff. The new system is live and we are asking researchers at the Department of Chemistry to start using it now. The benefits of the new system include:

  • you can deposit your data and articles in one place
  • you will instantly receive a placeholder DOI for data
  • your outputs get into the repository quicker, which increases their visibility
  • you enter the information about your publication once but it is used in many systems saving you time in the future
  • better reporting capabilities for the Open Access/Data, which means more accurate reports for Departments, Faculties and Schools
  • all research outputs can be uploaded to the repository via the new system

Come and see the new system being demonstrated and find out more about using it for all your research outputs. The demo will take approximately 30 minutes and there will be time for questions and answers.

Find out more here: http://osc.cam.ac.uk/open-research/symplectic-elements-deposit-pilot

We look forward to seeing you there!

oaDOI: find open access journal articles

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Try using oaDOI to find open access journal articles.

Just paste in a DOI on the oadoi website:

An oaDOI link is like a DOI, with a useful difference: if there’s an open access version of the article, the oaDOI URL will send you there, instead of the paywalled article landing page. So for instance,

Thing 13 – Creative Commons

23 Research Things Cambridge

Welcome to Week 5! We’re over halfway through the programme so well done for getting this far! This week we’re looking at Using Free Things, but Legally.

In Thing 11 and Thing 12 we introduced you to sharing your own content through different channels. Once something is posted on the internet, it is out there in the public sphere and you often don’t really have much control over it anymore. So how do you protect your rights to your own work? While most content *should* default to ‘all rights reserved’, the internet can be a bit hazy about what that really means in practice so to really push home how you want your content to be used and worked with, if at all, you can always attach a Creative Commons licence to it.

What is Creative Commons? Well check out this video where we explain it as…

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American Chemical Society announces intention to establish “ChemRxiv” preprint server to promote early research sharing

What do chemists think about this? Let me know!

ejournals@cambridge

WASHINGTON, Aug. 10, 2016 — The American Chemical Society (ACS) today announced its intention to form ChemRxiv, a chemistry preprint server for the global chemistry community, proposed as a collaborative undertaking that will facilitate the open dissemination of important scientific findings. The Society is presently in the process of inviting interested stakeholders to participate in helping to shape the service ahead of its anticipated launch.

ChemRxiv is expected to follow the established models of arXiv in physics and bioRxiv in the life sciences by enabling researchers working across diverse areas of inquiry to share early results and data with their scientist-colleagues ahead of formal peer review and publication,” says Kevin Davies, Ph.D., who, as Vice President within the ACS Publications Division, will be spearheading the effort as part of a joint undertaking with the Society’s Chemical Abstracts Service. “Preprints are fully citable and are freely accessible preliminary communications…

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Third Gold for Gold voucher of 2015 allocated!

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The third of the 19 Gold for Gold vouchers that the Royal Society of Chemistry has given to the University of Cambridge for 2015 has been used to make the following article immediately open access:

Continuous flow Buchwald–Hartwig amination of a pharmaceutical intermediate
Polina Yaseneva, Paul Hodgson, Jacek Zakrzewski, Sebastian Falß, Rebecca E. Meadows and  Alexei A. Lapkin
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00048C

To find out more about the Gold for Gold initiative, please see a previous blog post here: https://cambridgechemlib.wordpress.com/2015/03/30/new-rsc-gold-for-gold-vouchers-available-for-2015/.

There are still 16 vouchers left for 2015!

If you or at least one of the authors on an RSC paper are an academic member of the University of Cambridge, and there are no funds available for you to pay the APC to make your paper immediately open access, then you may be eligible for a Gold for Gold voucher! Please see the above blog post for information on how to apply.

Second Gold for Gold voucher of 2015 allocated!

RSCstaticbannerAccessBlue728x90_tcm18-201817

OAlogo

The second of the 19 Gold for Gold vouchers that the Royal Society of Chemistry has given to the University of Cambridge for 2015 has been used to make the following article immediately open access:

Supramolecular Polymer Networks Based on Cucurbit[8]uril Host-Guest Interactions as Aqueous Photo-Rheological Fluids
Cindy Soo Yun Tan, Jesus del Barrio, Ji Liu and Prof. Oren Scherman
Polymer Chemistry, 2015, Accepted Manuscript, DOI: 10.1039/C5PY01115A

To find out more about the Gold for Gold initiative, please see a previous blog post here: https://cambridgechemlib.wordpress.com/2015/03/30/new-rsc-gold-for-gold-vouchers-available-for-2015/.

There are still 17 vouchers left for 2015!

If you or at least one of the authors on an RSC paper are an academic member of the University of Cambridge, and there are no funds available for you to pay the APC to make your paper immediately open access, then you may be eligible for a Gold for Gold voucher! Please see the above blog post for information on how to apply.