Category Archives: Open Access

Connect your ORCID to your Symplectic Elements profile between Monday 16 October and Thursday 26 October for a chance to win a £150 Heffers voucher!

Open-in-Order-To-General-Poster

As part of Open Access Week 2017, any University of Cambridge member with a Symplectic Elements profile can enter this competition.

An ORCID is a unique identifier for researchers (disambiguating Jane Smith from Jane Smith) and meaning that if researchers change their names, their work remains linked together. It is simple and quick to get an ORCID, find out more and register quickly and easily for one here.

Symplectic Elements is an internal University system that collects information about your publications (amongst other things). You can login directly to Symplectic here.

The competition website includes a quick video tutorial on how to link your ORCID with Symplectic, but you can also see step-by-step instructions on the Research Information Moodle site (click on the ‘Enrol’ button if you are not already enrolled).

The winner of the prize draw will be announced on Friday 27 October 2017. Good luck!

orcid_128x128

How to get free (and legal) access to journal articles behind paywalls: the Open Access Button

Please have a read of this brilliant post by Lizzie Sparrow. Hopefully it can help you locate and use open access material more easily.

A.G. Leventis Library & Information Services

I’m sure all of you engaged in research will be familiar with messages such as this:

paywall

It’s an example of what you see when you are trying to access a journal article and hit what’s known as a paywall. If you’re lucky, your institution has paid for a subscription: you log in and voila! The PDF appears! If you’re not so lucky, you might feel stumped and as if the only way to read the article is to pay the requested cost.

But, this isn’t necessarily the case? Did you know that usually authors are entitled to make a free version of the article available via their institution? If you’ve ever come to me asking for an article you can only find behind a paywall and I email you back a PDF in 5 minutes, it’s most likely that this is the version I’ve found.

So now you want…

View original post 395 more words

ChemRxiv Beta open for submissions

ChemRxiv is a free online submission, distribution, and archival service for unpublished preprints in chemistry and related areas.

ChemRxiv is now available in a fully functioning Beta version for use and feedback by researchers. Find out more from this ACS press release: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2017/august/chemrxiv-beta-open-for-submissions-and-powered-by-figshare.html?hootPostID=c5c5e00bed4e6b0db448b1ba9bc18551.

ChemRxiv itself can be found here.

 

Convert your files containing experimental data into an open data format

OAlogo

As part of the Data Champions initiative, we invite members of the Department of Chemistry to contribute to a list of instructions for converting the data you generate through experiments using techniques such as NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, x-ray crystallography etc. into open data formats that can be shared easily.

The aim is to save researchers time and effort in trying to find this out themselves, and to make it as easy as possible for them to share their data in an open format that is accessible to everyone.

First on our list are very brief instructions for converting NMR spectroscopy data from TopSpin to a text file in the internationally accepted open data format JCAMP-DX.

Please send your instructions to library@ch.cam.ac.uk and they will be added to the list.

Data Champions at the Department of Chemistry

Data Champions are local experts on research data management and sharing who can provide advice and training within their departments.

Your Data Champions currently are:

We are currently planning research data management related activities that we can carry out in the department. Please let us have your ideas! Contact one of the Data Champions or Clair Castle, Librarian at the Department of Chemistry at library@ch.cam.ac.uk.

Please visit the Chemistry Library’s Open Data website to find out more about your Data Champions, and other resources that will help chemists do open research.

Make your data and papers open via Symplectic

Open Access and Open Data are changing: Share everything via Symplectic

Demo of new system in the Pfizer Lecture Theatre for members of the Department of Chemistry on 28th February at 13:15

img_symplecticbenefits_v4-20170215

The current Open Access and Open Data services are being integrated with Symplectic Elements, which will bring many benefits to researchers, administrators and the Open Access and Open Data staff. The new system is live and we are asking researchers at the Department of Chemistry to start using it now. The benefits of the new system include:

  • you can deposit your data and articles in one place
  • you will instantly receive a placeholder DOI for data
  • your outputs get into the repository quicker, which increases their visibility
  • you enter the information about your publication once but it is used in many systems saving you time in the future
  • better reporting capabilities for the Open Access/Data, which means more accurate reports for Departments, Faculties and Schools
  • all research outputs can be uploaded to the repository via the new system

Come and see the new system being demonstrated and find out more about using it for all your research outputs. The demo will take approximately 30 minutes and there will be time for questions and answers.

Find out more here: http://osc.cam.ac.uk/open-research/symplectic-elements-deposit-pilot

We look forward to seeing you there!

oaDOI: find open access journal articles

OAlogo

Try using oaDOI to find open access journal articles.

Just paste in a DOI on the oadoi website:

An oaDOI link is like a DOI, with a useful difference: if there’s an open access version of the article, the oaDOI URL will send you there, instead of the paywalled article landing page. So for instance,

Thing 13 – Creative Commons

23 Research Things Cambridge

Welcome to Week 5! We’re over halfway through the programme so well done for getting this far! This week we’re looking at Using Free Things, but Legally.

In Thing 11 and Thing 12 we introduced you to sharing your own content through different channels. Once something is posted on the internet, it is out there in the public sphere and you often don’t really have much control over it anymore. So how do you protect your rights to your own work? While most content *should* default to ‘all rights reserved’, the internet can be a bit hazy about what that really means in practice so to really push home how you want your content to be used and worked with, if at all, you can always attach a Creative Commons licence to it.

What is Creative Commons? Well check out this video where we explain it as…

View original post 179 more words