Category Archives: RSC

ChemRxiv Beta open for submissions

ChemRxiv is a free online submission, distribution, and archival service for unpublished preprints in chemistry and related areas.

ChemRxiv is now available in a fully functioning Beta version for use and feedback by researchers. Find out more from this ACS press release: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2017/august/chemrxiv-beta-open-for-submissions-and-powered-by-figshare.html?hootPostID=c5c5e00bed4e6b0db448b1ba9bc18551.

ChemRxiv itself can be found here.

 

National Chemical Database Service: help to justify its continued support

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Do you know about or already use the National Chemical Database Service (NCDS)?

It is an EPSRC-funded service provided by the Royal Society of Chemistry to all students and other members of UK academic institutions. It brings together tools and resources for UK researchers in chemistry and related fields.

All web-based services are freely accessible from any UK academic network. These include:

  • ACD/I-Lab – an online tool which features predictions and databases of physicochemical properties and NMR spectral information.an online tool which features predictions and databases of physicochemical properties and NMR spectral information.
  • Available Chemicals Directory (ACD) – a database of commercially available chemicals that can be searched by structure.
  • Chemicalize – a public web resource which identifies chemical structures in webpages and other text using ChemAxon’s Name to Structure parsing.
  • ChemSpider – a free chemical structure database providing access to over 28 million structures, properties and associated information from more than 400 data sources.
  • Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) – a collection of over 600,000 small-molecule organic and organometallic crystal structures that can be visualised and downloaded.
  • CrystalWorks – provides access to the wide range of crystallographic structural data made available by the Chemical Database Service.
  • DETHERM -one of the world’s largest thermophysical databases and contains data for 4,200,000 data sets, 129,500 mixtures, and 38,850 pure compounds.
  • Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) – the world’s largest database for fully identified inorganic crystal structures.
  • SPRESIweb – allows users to search 5.52 million molecules and 4.26 million reactions, extracted from 675,000 references and 164,000 patents covering the years 1974 – 2011.

Find more information about these resources here.

Help to demonstrate the scientific impact of the NCDS

The NCDS needs your help:

The National Chemical Database Service is supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council on the basis that it meets a community need: access to specialist databases that enable research in chemistry and related fields. As part of EPSRC’s routine review of mid-range facility provision, we are preparing an application (called a Statement of Need) to justify continued support of the NCDS after 2017. While we will collate the application on behalf of our Advisory Board, it represents the views and needs of the UK scientific community, so your input is vital to its success. You can help us ensure that all of UK academia retains access to the NCDS resources in the following ways:

Please see the post on the Chemical Database Service Blog here.

Third Gold for Gold voucher of 2015 allocated!

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The third of the 19 Gold for Gold vouchers that the Royal Society of Chemistry has given to the University of Cambridge for 2015 has been used to make the following article immediately open access:

Continuous flow Buchwald–Hartwig amination of a pharmaceutical intermediate
Polina Yaseneva, Paul Hodgson, Jacek Zakrzewski, Sebastian Falß, Rebecca E. Meadows and  Alexei A. Lapkin
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00048C

To find out more about the Gold for Gold initiative, please see a previous blog post here: https://cambridgechemlib.wordpress.com/2015/03/30/new-rsc-gold-for-gold-vouchers-available-for-2015/.

There are still 16 vouchers left for 2015!

If you or at least one of the authors on an RSC paper are an academic member of the University of Cambridge, and there are no funds available for you to pay the APC to make your paper immediately open access, then you may be eligible for a Gold for Gold voucher! Please see the above blog post for information on how to apply.

New RSC online journals temporarily available for free

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The University, as a Gold subscriber to Royal Society of Chemistry journals, has free temporary access to the following online journals:

RSC Mobile: access RSC journals subscribed content via the University wireless network

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RSC Mobile provides readers with access to search University subscribed RSC journals content from the RSC Publishing Platform via the University’s wireless network.

Download the app while you’re connected to a University wireless network (UniOfCam or Eduroam) and access the most relevant scientific research via Latest Articles or Search options and save articles for reading offline.

RSC Mobile includes:

  • Up-to-the-minute access to RSC journals
  • Full text HTML and PDF access via wireless networks for subscribing institutions/organisations
  • The latest news from our RSC Publishing Platform
  • Saving articles for offline reading
  • Share your favourite content via email, Twitter or Facebook

Find out more here!

Second Gold for Gold voucher of 2015 allocated!

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The second of the 19 Gold for Gold vouchers that the Royal Society of Chemistry has given to the University of Cambridge for 2015 has been used to make the following article immediately open access:

Supramolecular Polymer Networks Based on Cucurbit[8]uril Host-Guest Interactions as Aqueous Photo-Rheological Fluids
Cindy Soo Yun Tan, Jesus del Barrio, Ji Liu and Prof. Oren Scherman
Polymer Chemistry, 2015, Accepted Manuscript, DOI: 10.1039/C5PY01115A

To find out more about the Gold for Gold initiative, please see a previous blog post here: https://cambridgechemlib.wordpress.com/2015/03/30/new-rsc-gold-for-gold-vouchers-available-for-2015/.

There are still 17 vouchers left for 2015!

If you or at least one of the authors on an RSC paper are an academic member of the University of Cambridge, and there are no funds available for you to pay the APC to make your paper immediately open access, then you may be eligible for a Gold for Gold voucher! Please see the above blog post for information on how to apply.

NCDS trialling free access to ADME-Tox predictive tools

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For the last two months the National Chemical Database Service has been trialling a new free resource: the ADME-Tox predictive features of ACD/I-Lab.

All UK academics can try them out now for free through ACD/I-Lab at the NCDS website.

The Royal Society of Chemistry receives funding from the EPSRC to host the National Chemical Database Service. Based on community suggestions and needs, it licenses various resources and databases to make them freely available to all UK academics. The features they are now trialling include industry-leading algorithms for predicting ADME properties such as bioavailability and absorption, as well as toxicity properties such as LD50.

The RSC’s trial period will expire at the end of July, so they’ll soon be making a decision about whether to pay to license ACD/Labs’s ADME-Tox features on a permanent basis. It relies on feedback from researchers to guide their decisions, so if you find that access to ADME-Tox predictive tools is useful for your research, please let them know to help them understand the value of this resource to the UK academic community.